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Byron Langdon papers

 Collection — Box: Communal Collections 2, Placement: 06
Identifier: MSP 28

Scope and Contents

The Byron Langdon papers are comprised of an original draft of a bill by state Senator Byron W. Langdon passed by the Indiana Legislature in 1879. It authorized the board of commissioners of bench courts in the state to appoint two students to attend the university without tuition and matriculation fee, thus making every county in the state participants in the superior advantages of Purdue. There is also a nameplate stating that the original draft was presented to Purdue University on its fiftieth anniversary by Lillie Langdon Phillips. There is also a photograph of Senator Langdon.

Dates

  • 1879

Creator

Language of Materials

Collection material is in English.

Access Information

The collection is open for research.

Copyright and Use Information

Portions of material in this collection are in the public domain. Other material copyrights held by Purdue University or original creator. Consult with Purdue University Archives and Special Collections prior to reproduction of materials.

Biographical Information

Judge Byron William Langdon was born on Aug. 1, 1838 at Jamestown, NY, the son of John and Jane Ann (Duff) Langdon. Byron was a legal scholar, law firm attorney, Civil War veteran, Indiana representative and senator, and a judge. He spent his entire legal career in Lafayette, Indiana.

Byron's legal career was interrupted briefly by service in the Civil War. The war in Indiana was marked by a daring raid in July 1863 by Confederate General Morgan. The "Morgan's Raid" in the southern part of the state led to an outcry for defenders, and Indiana Governor Morton put out a call for volunteers.

Byron joined the 108th IN Volunteer Infantry, where he was made sergeant major. His service only lasted about a week, until the raiders were driven back.

In 1876, Byron was elected by county Republicans to serve as their county representative to the Indiana legislature. During the campaign, he made many stump speeches, including at least five in the span of one week in October of that year, in such places as Romney, Sugar Grove, Culver's Station, Clark's Hill and Montmorency. Once elected, "…he served with marked distinction to himself and rare fidelity to the interests of his constituents. He was a member of the judiciary committee of the house and chairman of the educational committee. Purdue University found in him a zealous and watchful friend, he having introduced no less than three separate and distinct bills in the interests of this institution, among them the bill authorizing the board of commissioners of bench courts in the state to appoint two students to attend the university without tuition and matriculation fee, thus making every county in the state participants in the superior advantages of Purdue. No member of the house or legislature of 1876 - was more active and vigilant…, and his record was a source of pride to the people of Tippecanoe county."

At his death on May 18, 1913, he was eulogized as a "prominent lawyer and citizen who served in the state legislature and was in many important cases was a man of stern and rugged character."

Extent

0.025 Cubic Feet (One folder)

Acquisition Information

Donated by Lillie Langdon Phillips. Date of donation is unknown.

Processing Information

The material has been housed in polyester sleeves, an acid-free folder and acid-free box.
Title
Byron Langdon papers
Status
Under Review
Author
Mary A. Sego
Date
2020-06-08
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
English
Edition statement
Second edition. Collection description first completed 2010-06-09.

Repository Details

Part of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections Repository

Contact:
504 W. State Street
West Lafayette Indiana 47907 United States
765-494-2839